Dumpling Festival or Duanwu Festival, also known as Dragon Boat Festival and the Double Fifth, is a traditional and statutory holiday originating inChina and associated with a number of East Asian and Southeast Asian societies. In Mandarin, it is known as Duānwǔ Jié; in Hong Kong and Macau, by the Cantonese name Tuen Ng Festival; in Hokkien-speaking areas, by the names Gō͘-go̍eh-cheh/Gō͘-ge̍h-choeh (五月節) and Gō͘-ji̍t-cheh/Gō͘-ji̍t-choeh (五日節). In 2008, it was recognised as a public holiday in mainland Chinafor the first time since the 1940s.[1][2] The festival has also long been celebrated in TaiwanSingapore, and Malaysia. Equivalent and related festivals in Asia include the Kodomo no hi in JapanDano in Korea, and Tết Đoan Ngọ in Vietnam.

The festival occurs on the 5th day of the 5th month of the lunar calendar on which the Chinese calendar is based. This is the source of the alternative name of Double Fifth.[3] In 2011, this fell on June 6 and in 2012 on June 23. The focus of the celebrations includes eating rice dumplings zongzi (Chinese: 粽子; pinyin: zòngzi)[4], drinking realgar wine xionghuangjiu (Chinese: 雄黃酒; pinyin: Xiónghuángjiǔ), and racing dragon boats.

Like all other traditional festivals, Duanwu is reckoned in accordance with the lunar calendar consisting of 29 or 30 days. For this reason, Duanwu—the fifth day of the fifth moon, or double fifth—drifts from year to year on the Gregorian (solar) calendar.

The sun is considered to be at its strongest around the time of summer solstice (“mid-summer” in traditional East Asia, but “beginning” of summer elsewhere) when the daylight in the northern hemisphere is the longest. The sun (yang), like the dragon (long), traditionally represents masculine energy, whereas the moon (yue), like the phoenix (or firebird, fenghuang), traditionally represents feminine energy. The summer solstice is considered the peak annual moment of male energy[5] while the winter solstice, the longest night of the year, represents the peak annual moment of feminine energy. The masculine image of the dragon is thus naturally associated with Duanwu.

Read More in Duanwu Festival – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Latest News on Dumpling Festival 2012

 

 

Dumpling tales and traditions
China Daily
Almost all Chinese festivals are linked to foods, and many have stories behind them. The origin of zongzi, rice dumplings wrapped in leaves, is most often linked

and more »…More at Dumpling tales and traditions – China Daily

 


Malaysia Star

Group gathers to make dumplings
Malaysia Star
MORE than 70 members from the A Formosa Women's Organisation of Malaysia (FWOM) and the Chan She Shu Yuen Clan Association gathered recently to
…More at Group gathers to make dumplings – Malaysia Star

 


China Daily

Traditional ties that bind
China Daily
The Chinese celebrate Duanwu Festival by eating rice dumplings of all shapes and sizes. For some who live in other countries, it is a yearly tradition, just as their
Shrimp between whalesGlobal Times

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